Eggs

Eggs

Eggs can be fried, scrambled, or poached, but they're also used to bind ingredients in baked dishes, thicken foods, emulsify dressings, get breading to stick to meat and fish, make cakes and soufflés expand, glaze baked goods, and more.


They're also highly nutritious.


For egg substitutions in recipes, click here.

duck egg
duck egg
Compared to chicken eggs, these are larger, higher in fat and more colorful, though they have a slightly fishy flavor. They're sometimes contaminated with bacteria, so make sure you cook them thoroughly.
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egg yolks
egg yolks
Higher in fat, but increasing the egg yolks in a baked good often makes it moister and more flavorful. Egg yolks make wonderful thickeners--imparting both a rich flavor and velvety smooth texture--but they're tricky to use. You can't just whisk them into a simmering sauce--they'd curdle on contact. Instead, you need to "temper" them by adding some of the hot liquid to the egg yolks, whisking the mixture together, and then adding it to the sauce. To prevent the yolks from coagulating, you need to keep the sauce below 190°, although this rule can be broken if the sauce has a lot of flour in it. Finally, never cook sauces with egg yolks in aluminum pans or they'll turn gray.
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meringue powder
meringue powder
Look for this in stores that sell cake decorating supplies. Substitutes: powdered egg whites. For information on how to make meringues safely using raw egg whites, visit the Other Safety Factors section of the American Egg Board web site.
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powdered egg whites
powdered egg whites
Look for this in stores that sell cake decorating supplies. Just Whites is a popular brand. For information on how to make meringues safely using raw egg whites, visit the Other Safety Factors section of the American Egg Board web site.
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salted duck egg
salted duck egg
See the Recipesource.com recipe for Salted Eggs.
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