Nut Flours & Meals

Nut Flours & Meals
acorn starch
acorn starch
Look for this in Korean markets.
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almond meal
almond meal
Specialty stores carry this, but you can get it for less at Middle Eastern markets.
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cashew flour
cashew flour
This is hard to find.
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chestnut flour, farina di castagne, roasted chestnut flour, sweet chestnut flour
chestnut flour
Italian use chestnut flour to make rich desserts, and sometimes breads and pasta. It also makes terrific pancakes. Don't confuse it with water chestnut flour, which is used in Asian cuisine.
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hazelnut flour, filbert flour
hazelnut flour
This is ground from the cake that remains after the oil is pressed from hazelnuts. This is hard to find, but you can order it from Baker's Find (1-800-966-BAKE) or online from from King Arthur Flour.
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hazelnut meal, filbert meal, ground filberts, ground hazelnuts
hazelnut meal
This is used to make cookies and other desserts.
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nut flour
nut flour
Nut flours are ground from the cake that remains after oils are pressed from nuts. They're great for breading fish or chicken, and they add a rich flavor to baked goods. Nut flour lacks the gluten that baked goods need to rise, so in those recipes substitute no more than 1/4 of the wheat flour with nut flour. Nut flours go stale quickly, so store them in the refrigerator or freezer, and use them up quickly.
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nut meal, ground nuts
nut meal
Nut meals are ground from whole nuts, and are grittier and oilier than nut flours, which are ground from the cake that remains after the oils are pressed from nuts. To make your own nut meals, grind toasted nuts in a nut mill until the meal has the consistency of cornmeal. You can also use a food processor fitted with a steel blade to do this, but it's hard to keep the nut meal from turning into nut butter. It helps to freeze the nuts before grinding, to use the pulse setting on the processor, and to add any sugar in the recipe to the nuts to help absorb the oils. Store nut meals in the refrigerator or freezer, and use them soon after you buy or make them.
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peanut powder
peanut powder
Indian cooks use this to thicken their curries.
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praline powder
This is used to flavor ice cream and pastry fillings. It's made from pralines, a crunchy French candy that resembles peanut brittle, except that it's made with almonds or hazelnuts. You can buy praline powder ready made, but it's easy to make your own by pulverizing praline pieces in a food processor. Be sure to use crunchy pralines, not the soft pecan candies that people in New Orleans call pralines.
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