Dairy

Dairy

This category includes milk and cream, cheese, eggs, and cultured milk products, like yogurt, buttermilk, and sour cream.

Abondance
Abondance
This French raw milk cheese has a subtle, nutty flavor. It's a good melting cheese.
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acidophilis milk
Friendly bacteria is reintroduced into this milk after pasteurization.
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Alouette
This is one of several spreadable cheeses that combine cream cheese with various flavorings, like herbs, garlic, pesto, and sun-dried tomatoes. You can set them out with crackers for guests, but your gourmet friends probably won't indulge.
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American cheese, American cheese food, American pasteurized process cheese food
American cheese
These are often sold in individually wrapped sandwich slices.
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Appenzell, Appenzeller
Appenzell
This is a creamy and pleasantly stinky cheese.
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asadero, Chihuahua®, Oaxaca cheese, queso asadero
asadero
This stringy Mexican cheese melts nicely, so it's great on quesadillas.
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Asiago (aged)
Asiago (aged)
This grating cheese is similar to Parmesan and Romano, but it's sweeter. It's good on pizza. There's no need to spring for a pricy Italian Asiago--our domestic knock-offs are pretty good. Don't confuse aged Asiago with the relatively obscure fresh Asiago cheese, which is semi-soft.
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Asiago (fresh)
Asiago (fresh)
Don't confuse this with aged Asiago, which is a firm grating cheese.
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Bavarian blue
Bavarian blue
This is a mild and creamy German blue cheese. It's good for crumbling on salads and snacking. Paladin Bavarian Blue is a popular brand.
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Beaufort
Beaufort
This semi-firm cheese is slightly sweet and has a nice texture. It's a great melting cheese, so it's often used in fondues.
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Beaumont cheese
This French cow's milk cheese has a mild, nutty flavor
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Bel Paese
Bel Paese
This is a mild, semi-soft Italian cheese that's good with apples, pears, and fruity red wines. It's also shredded and used to make pizza, risotto, and pasta dishes.
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bierkäse, beer cheese, beer kaese, bierkaese, Weisslacker
bierkäse
This is a soft, stinky cheese. German like to put it on rye bread along with some sliced onion, and have it with beer. It's too overpowering to serve with wine.
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Bleu d'Auvergne
Bleu d'Auvergne
A moist, crumbly, and somewhat salty blue cheese from France. It's milder and cheaper than Roquefort, and it works well in salad dressings or as a snacking cheese.
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Bleu de Bresse, BLUH-duh-BRESS
Bleu de Bresse
This blue cheese from France is made with cow's milk, and is buttery and mild. It's a safe but unexciting cheese to serve company. An American version called Bresse bleu is milder still.
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Bleu de Chevre
This French blue cheese is made with goat's milk. It's shaped as a pyramid, and has a distinctive country (or barnyard, some would say) flavor.
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Bleu de Gex
The French have been producing this excellent but hard-to-find blue cheese since the 13th century. Made with cow's milk, it's pungent without being overpowering.
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Blue Castello
Blue Castello
This is a rich, moist, and creamy blue cheese. It's fairly mild and a good choice for unadventurous guests.
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blue cheese, blue-veined cheese
blue cheese
Many centuries ago, cheese was left to age in some moldy cave and became streaked with bluish-green mold. But rather than spoiling the cheese, the mold gave it a pungent and distinctive flavor, and blue cheese was born. Since then, cheese-makers learned to inject or stir mold spores into different cheeses, and many still use caves to age them. Blue cheese--either crumbled or in a dressing--nicely balances bitter greens in salads. You can also pair it with bread, crackers, or fruit for an appetizer, or let it melt on pasta or grilled meats. Blue cheeses vary in pungency--I'd serve a mild blue cheese like Cambozola at a neighborhood get-together, and a more pungent blue like Saint Agur or Cabrales to fellow foodies that I'm trying to impress. Stilton is the most renown blue cheese, and a reliable party-pleaser. Blue cheeses grow more pungent with age or mishandling, and it's best to use them within a few days of purchase. Like almost all cheeses, blues should be brought to room temperature before serving.
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boursault
boursault
This is a soft-ripened, triple crème French cheese that very rich and mild. For best flavor, serve at room temperature.
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Boursin
Boursin
This creamy cheese from France is usually flavored with herbs, garlic or coarse ground pepper. It's mild and delicate, and goes well with fresh bread and dry white wine. Boursin is considered better than some other flavored spreadable cheeses, like Alouette or Rondelé, but none of these cheeses are well regarded by gourmets. Store Boursin in the refrigerator but bring it to room temperature before serving. Eat it within a few days of purchase.
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brick cheese
brick cheese
This is a pungent American washed-rind cheese.
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brie
brie
This French cheese is rich, mild, and creamy, and it's soft enough to spread easily on crackers or bread. As with Camembert cheese, the Brie name isn't protected so there are lots of mediocre knock-offs on the market. Look for French Bries--they're usually much better than their American counterparts. The rind is edible. For best flavor, wait until it's perfectly ripe and warmed to room temperature before serving it.
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Brillat Savarin cheese
Brillat Savarin cheese
This soft triple crème French cheese is rich, buttery, and mild, though some find it a bit sour and salty.
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Brinza cheese, Bryndza cheese, Brynza cheese
Brinza cheese
Look for this salty sheep's milk cheese in Eastern European markets. It's spreadable when young, but becomes crumbly as it ages. Like Feta, it's good in salads or melted on pizza
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buttermilk
buttermilk
Despite its name and creamy consistency, buttermilk is relatively low in fat. It's sometimes tolerated by people with lactose intolerance since some of the lactose is fermented by bacteria. Most of the buttermilk found in supermarkets is cultured buttermilk, made by adding a bacterial culture to low-fat or nonfat milk. More authentic and tasty, though, is churn buttermilk, which is the liquid that remains after milk is churned into butter. Since recipes often call for just small amounts of buttermilk, many cooks use reconstituted powdered buttermilk. Churn buttermilk may require longer baking times than ordinary commercial buttermilk.
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buttermilk cheese
buttermilk cheese
You won't find this tangy, creamy cheese in supermarkets, but it's easy to make at home. To make your own: Line a colander with several folds of cheesecloth or a kitchen towel. Pour buttermilk into the cloth, then put the colander into a larger container and let it drain overnight in the refrigerator until it's reduced to a cheeselike consistency.
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Cabrales, queso de Cabrales
Cabrales
This is a crumbly and very pungent blue cheese from Spain. It is usuually made from cow's milk but can be made with other kinds of milk.
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Caciocavallo, Cacciocavallo
Caciocavallo
This Italian cheese is similar to provolone. This can be made from cow’s milk or sheep’s milk.
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Caciotta, Casciotta
Caciotta
This mild Italian cheese is made with a blend of sheep's milk and cow's milk cheese.
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Caerphilly
Caerphilly
This Welsh cow's milk cheese is crumbly and a good melter.
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Cambozola
Cambozola
This German cheese combines the moist, rich creaminess of Camembert with the sharpness of blue Gorgonzola. It's one of the mildest blue cheeses.
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Camembert
Camembert
This popular soft-ripened cheese is buttery rich and wonderful to spread on hot French bread. The name's not protected, so there are lots of Camemberts of varying quality on the market. Try to get a French raw milk Camembert--our pasteurized domestic versions are bland in comparison. Use within a few days after purchasing. For best flavor, serve at room temperature.
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Cantal
Cantal
This French cheese is sweet when young but earthy and grassy when aged. It's a reliable party-pleaser--mild but complex.
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Caprice des Dieux
This oval French cheese resembles Camembert and Brie.
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Caprini
This is an excellent Italian fresh cheese that's hard to find in the U.S.
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Carré de l'est
This is a square washed rind, moderately stinky cheese from France.
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casero cheese
casero cheese
This is a mild white Mexican cheese.
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Cashel Bleu, Cashel Blue, Irish Cashel
Cashel Bleu
This creamy yet crumbly blue cheese from Ireland has a tangy but mellow flavor. It's cheaper than Stilton but not quite as good.
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Chaource cheese
Chaource cheese
This French cheese is similar to Brie and Camembert, but creamier and more acidic. It's good with champagne.
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Chaubier cheese
Chaubier cheese
This mild French cheese is made with a blend of cow and goat milk.
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Cheddar, Tillamook
Cheddar
The curds of many English cheeses are "cheddared" or cut them into slabs and stacked to allow whey to drain off. Some cheddars have more lactose in them, making them "sharp" or acidic. Less sharp cheddars are often labeled "mild" or "medium." England supplies many fine Cheddars, as does Vermont and Tillamook, Oregon.
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Cheshire  , Blue Cheshire
Cheshire
Said to be England's oldest cheese, is a good cooking cheese. Blue Cheshire is a blue-veined version.
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chevre (aged)
Don't confuse this aged goat cheese with the far more common chevre frais (fresh chevre). Use within a few days after purchasing. For best flavor, serve at room temperature.
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clotted cream, Devon cream, Devonshire cream
clotted cream
See the Making Your Own Devonshire or Clotted Cream or Mock Devonshire Clotted Cream postings on RecipeSource.com.
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Colby
This Wisconsin cheese resembles a mild Cheddar.
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cold-pack cheese
This is a soft spreadable mix of cheeses used for snacking.
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