Flavorings Category

Flavorings
Includes sweeteners, herbs, spices, chocolate, and extracts.
Spanish brandy
Spanish brandy
This sweet and heavy brandy is based on sherry.
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sparkling wine, bubbly, Champagne
sparkling wine
When first opened, sparkling wine becomes effervescent as bubbles of carbon dioxide gas escape from the liquid. It was first produced by Dom Pérignon in the 17th century, who cried out after sampling it, "Come quickly. I am drinking stars!" Champagne is perhaps the finest example of sparkling wine, and is named for the region in France where it's produced. The brand Dom Pérignon is considered to be the finest champagne. Sparkling wine and champagne are rated by their relative sweetness. The driest is brut, followed by extra dry, sec, and the sweetest of all, demi-sec. Sparkling wines are used to toast special occasions like weddings and the New Year, but they're also served before meals. They're especially nice with caviar.
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sprinkles
sprinkles
These are small candies that are sprinkled on cakes and cookies.
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spumante
spumante
This is Italian sparkling wine. Asti spumante is a well-known sparkling wine produced in Asti, Italy.
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spun honey, cream honey, creamed honey, crème honey, honey, spun, whipped honey
spun honey
This is honey that's blended with pieces of the comb so that it spreads more easily. It's more popular in Europe than in America
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squash seeds
squash seeds
The seeds of various squashes, like pumpkin and acorn squash, make terrific snacks. To prepare, wash the seeds, then blot them dry, and mix them with salt and butter. Spread the seeds on a baking tray and bake them in a preheated 325° oven for about 15 minutes.
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Sriracha
Sriracha
This is a hot sauce used as a condiment by Thais and Vietnamese.
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star anise, anise, badian, Chinese anise, Chinese star anise, whole anise
star anise
Asian cooks use star anise to give a licorice flavor to savory dishes, particularly those with pork and poultry. It's available whole or ground. Use it sparingly--a little goes a long way.
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sucanat, dehydrated sugar cane juice, granulated sugar cane juice
sucanat
This is pure dried sugar cane juice. The dark color is due to the retention of molasses.
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sucralose
An artifical sweetner. A popular brand is Splenda.
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sugar, bar sugar, berry sugar, caster sugar, castor sugar
sugar
Varieties: By crystal size: Regular sugar = fine granulated sugar = table sugar = standard granulated sugar = extra-fine granulated sugar is the standard table sugar we're all familiar with. Superfine sugar = ultrafine sugar = bar sugar = instant dissolving sugar = berry sugar = castor sugar = caster sugar dissolves more quickly, and is recommended for sweetening beverages, and for making meringues, cakes, soufflés, and mousses. To make your own, grind standard granulated sugar in a food processor or blender for about a minute. Baker's special has a grain size between standard granulated and superfine. Bakers use it in cakes because the fine granules improve the texture. Sanding sugar has larger granules that sparkle when sprinkled on baked goods and candies. Coarse sugar has a larger grain size than regular granulated sugar. It tends not to change color or break down at high temperatures. It's similar to (and often mistaken for) sanding sugar. By source: Beet sugar is derived from sugar beets, while cane sugar is derived from sugar cane. Both beet and cane sugars are 99.95% sucrose, but many bakers claim that the remaining .05% of trace minerals and proteins makes a difference, and that cane sugar performs better. Some cane sugar is processed using a by-product of animal bones, so some vegetarians prefer beet sugar to cane. Some manufacturers don't specify whether their product is beet sugar or cane sugar.
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sugar cane
sugar cane
These are fun to chew on. They're available in the produce section either peeled (left) or unpeeled.
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sumac berries, ghora angur, somagh
sumac berries
Look for this in Middle Eastern markets. Crushed dried sumac is called somagh.
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summer savory
summer savory
Summer savory is milder than winter savory.
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sunflower seeds
sunflower seeds
Sunflower seeds are nutritious snacks. They're often sold in their shells, which you're supposed to crack open in your teeth and spit out after you've eaten the kernel within. Shelled sunflower seeds are also available for the more fastidious, and for cooks who want to add the seeds to breads, salads, casseroles, and trail mixes.
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sweet Asian basil, bai horapa, bai horapha, sweet basil
sweet Asian basil
This has a pleasant anise flavor, and is the most commonly used basil in Thailand.
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sweet basil, Genovese basil, Italian basil
sweet basil
This is widely used throughout the Mediterranean region to make tomato sauces, pesto, and other dishes.
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sweet bean sauce
sweet bean sauce
This brown sauce is made from sweetened fermented soybeans. Taiwanese cooks use it as a marinade or a condiment for meats.
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sweet chocolate, cholocate, sweet, German chocolate, sweet baking chocolate
sweet chocolate
This is similar to semi-sweet chocolate, only it has a bit more sugar. It can be used interchangeably with bittersweet and semi-sweet chocolate in most recipes. Baker's Chocolate calls its sweet chocolate German chocolate.
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sweet vermouth, bianco, Italian vermouth, red vermouth, rosso
sweet vermouth
This comes as either red vermouth (rosso) or sweet white vermouth (bianco). It's used to make many cocktails, including Manhattans and Negronis. If you're planning to make martinis, you probably want dry vermouth.
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sweetners, artifical
This includes: Acesulfame K, Advantame, Aspartame, Saccharin and Sucralose.
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Syrah
Syrah
This wine is called Syrah in Europe and America, and Shiraz in Australia. It's a dry red wine that's especially good with barbecued meats, sausages, strong cheeses, and spicy foods. Don't confuse Syrah with Petite Syrah.
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Szechuan pepper salt
See the Chinese Salt and Pepper Recipe posted on RecipeSource.com.
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Szechwan peppercorn, anise pepper, brown peppercorn, Chinese aromatic pepper
Szechwan peppercorn
These aren't true peppercorns, but rather dried flower buds. You're most likely to encounter them as part of a mixture, like the Chinese five-spice powder or the Japanese shichimi togarashi. Toast Szechwan peppercorns briefly in a hot pan before using.
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table salt, cooking salt, granular salt
table salt
Varieties include iodized salt, which contains the flavorless additive potassium iodide to prevent goiter (an enlargement of the thyroid gland), and non-iodized salt. Some recipes call for non-iodized salt, since iodine can impart a bitter taste and adversely react with certain foods. For example, iodine darkens pickles and inhibits the bacterial fermentation needed to make sauerkraut. Table salt also contains small amounts of calcium silicate, an anti-caking agent, and dextrose, a stabilizer. The anti-caking agent in both iodized and non-iodized salt doesn't dissolve in water, so if you pickle or can with it, it will turn the liquid cloudy or else settle on the bottom of the jar. The preserved food will taste the same, mind you, but it won't look as appealing. This is more of a problem for pickles, which are immersed in lots of liquid, than for other canned goods. To prevent the cloudiness, use pickling salt, which contains no additives.
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table wine, still wine
table wine
Table wines are intended to be served with meals, and they're often classified by color: red, white or rosé.
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tandoori seasoning
tandoori seasoning
See the Tandoori Rub posting on RecipeSource.com
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tapenade
tapenade
See the recipe for Tapenade posted on About.com.
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tarragon, estragon
tarragon
The French are especially fond of this aromatic, anise-like herb. They often use it to flavor delicately flavored foods like eggs, fish, cheese, and chicken, and it's an indispensable ingredient in sauce béarnaise and in the herb mixture the French call fines herbes. Use it sparingly--a little goes a long way. Frozen tarragon is an excellent substitute for fresh, but use the dried version only in a pinch.
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tarragon vinegar, tarragon wine vinegar
tarragon vinegar
This popular herb vinegar is used to make Béarnaise sauce and vinaigrettes. It's easy to make at home. Just put one or two sprigs of clean, fresh tarragon in a bottle of warm white wine vinegar, tightly seal the bottle, and let it stand for at least a few days.The sprigs will eventually become bitter, so remove or replace them after a few weeks. Make sure that the vinegar you use has an acidity level of at least 5% (this information is given on the label). Don't add too much tarragon to the bottle, or you may reduce the acidity of the vinegar so much that it loses its ability to preserve.
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Thai basil, licorice basil
Thai basil
Thai basil has purple stems and flowers. It has a milder flavor than holy basil.
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thyme
thyme
This herb is widely used in Mediterranean countries to flavor stews and meat sauces. It's often used in combination with other herbs, like rosemary, parsley, and oregano. Use dried thyme only in a pinch--fresh thyme is far more flavorful.
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tia to, Korean perilla, perilla, tia tô
tia to
These leaves are purple on one side and green on the other. They have a pleasant, peppery flavor that tastes a bit like cinnamon. Vietnamese cooks often add them to soups at the last minute.
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Tokaj wine
Ordinary Tokay table wine is mediocre, but some Tokay grapes are affected by Botrytis cinerea, a fungus that pokes holes in their skins and makes them shrivel on the vine. This concentrates the sweetness and makes for an exquisite dessert wine. Look for bottles labeled Tokay Aszú, the Hungarian name for botrytised Tokay wine.
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tomato juice
tomato juice
To make your own: See the Tomato Juice Recipe posted on Recipesource.com.
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