Liquids

Liquids
Includes alcoholic beverages, stocks, juices, and vinegar
clotted cream
clotted cream
See the Making Your Own Devonshire or Clotted Cream or Mock Devonshire Clotted Cream postings on RecipeSource.com.
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coconut cream
coconut cream
Don't confuse this with cream of coconut.
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coconut milk
coconut milk
This is available in liquid form (in cans or aseptic containers), frozen, and as a powder. Don't confuse coconut milk with coconut water, which is the liquid found in the center of a fresh coconut, or with the sweetened cream of coconut powder used in mixed drinks. Varieties: Light (or "lite") coconut milk has less fat and about a quarter of the calories of the regular version, but doesn't taste nearly as rich. You can reduce the fat (and calories) in a can of regular coconut milk by letting it settle, and then skimming and discarding some of the thick coconut cream off the top. Lighten what's left even more by diluting it with water or chicken broth. Where to find it: Asian foods section of many supermarkets.
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coconut rum
coconut rum
This is white rum flavored with coconut. Malibu Rum and CocoRibe are well-known brands.
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coconut syrup
coconut syrup
Hawaiians like to pour this syrup on pancakes, but it's also used in several mixed drinks. To make your own: See the recipe for coconut syrup posted on kitchenmixes.com.
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coconut vinegar
coconut vinegar
This is a somewhat harsh and potent vinegar that's common in the Philippines, Southeast Asia, and southern India.
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coconut water
coconut water
This is the liquid found inside a coconut.
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coffee liqueurs
coffee liqueurs
Coffee-flavored liqueurs are used to make Black and White Russians and other mixed drinks. Popular brands include Mexico's Kahlúa and the rum-based Tía Maria from Jamaica. See the (Substitute for) Kahlua recipe posting on SOAR, or the Tia Maria recipe posted by Bar-None.
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cognac
cognac
The very best cognacs are labeled VVSOP, Napoleon, Vieille Reserve, Grand Reserve, Royal, or Vieux. Next in the rankings are cognacs labeled Extra Old (XO), Extra, or Hors D'Age. After that comes VSOP (Very Superior Old Pale), Reserve, or VO. Next come cognacs with VS or *** on their labels. Connoisseurs also check for the cru, or place where the cognac was made. The best crus are Grande Champagne and Petite Champagne.
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Cointreau
Cointreau
This is an orange liqueur that’s not as well regarded as Grand Marnier, but considered a step above curaçao and triple sec.
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cold duck
cold duck
This is a sweetened blend of sparkling wines. It's cheap and tastes like it.
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cooking wine
cooking wine
You should never cook with a wine you wouldn't drink, but some "cooking wines" sold at stores violate this maxim. Avoid them and instead cook with inexpensive, but drinkable, table wines. Avoid putting wine in aluminum or iron pans for prolonged periods.
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corn syrup
corn syrup
This is a thick, sweet syrup that's popular in America, but hard to find in other countries. Unlike other sweeteners, corn syrup doesn't crystallize and turn grainy when it's cold, so it's a good choice for frostings, fudge sauces, and candies. Baked goods made with corn syrup are moister and stay fresher longer than those made with sugar. There are two types: dark corn syrup is dark brown and has a slight molasses flavor, while light corn syrup is almost clear and has a more delicate flavor. The two can be used interchangeably in many recipes. Karo is a well-known brand. Store corn syrup at room temperature.
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corn whiskey
corn whiskey
Like Bourbon, corn whiskey is made from corn, but it's not nearly as elegant and smooth as its pricier relative. It's a bit hard to find, but some brands--like Platte Valley, Virginia Lightning and Turkey Mountain--are still being produced. Whiskey should be served at room temperature.
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cranberry juice
cranberry juice
See the recipe for Cranberry Juice posted by Veggies Unite!
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cranberry liqueur
cranberry liqueur
Boggs is a well-regarded brand.
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cream
cream
Creams vary according to the amount of butterfat they have. Lightest of all is half & half, which is half milk, half cream and weighs in with a butterfat content between 10.5 - 18%. It can't be whipped, but it's nice with coffee, or on cereal. Light cream = coffee cream = table cream is richer at 18 - 30% fat, but it still can't be whipped. Light whipping cream = whipping cream (with a butterfat content of 30 - 36%) and heavy cream = heavy whipping cream (with at least 36% fat) are heavy enough to whip, and aren't as prone as lower-fat creams to curdling in sauces. The higher the butterfat content, the less beating is required to get whipped cream. Europeans go for even heavier creams, like double cream (with a butterfat content of 42%), extra-thick double cream, and clotted cream = Devonshire cream, which is often spread like butter over scones. Look for clotted cream in large supermarkets, but (perhaps luckily) the double creams are very hard to find. You can buy ultra-pasteurized versions of these creams, but they tend to have a burnt milk taste and don't whip as well.
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cream of coconut
cream of coconut
Don't confuse this with coconut cream, which is used in Asian dishes. Cream of coconut is thick and very sweet, and commonly used in mixed drinks. Where to find it: liquor stores, available in liquid and powdered forms.
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crema
crema
Cremas are the Hispanic version of sour cream. This category includes crema mexicana, which is similar to crème fraîche; crema centroamericana, which is a bit thicker and sweeter than crema mexicana; crema media, which is like whipping cream; crema Mexicana agria, which is thicker and more acidic than crema Mexicana and often used for savory dishes; and crema salvadoreña, which is thick like sour cream. Look for it in Mexican and Central American grocery stores.
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crème d'abricots
This is a crème liqueur that has an apricot flavor.
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crème d'amande
This is a crème liqueur that has an almond flavor
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crème d'ananas
This is a crème liqueur that has a pineapple flavor.
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crème de banane
This is a crème liqueur that has a banana flavor. It's often used to make banana daiquiris.
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crème de cacao
crème de cacao
This is a crème liqueur that has a chocolate flavor. Buy either white (actually clear) or dark crème de cacao--they both taste the same.
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crème de café
This is a crème liqueur that has a coffee flavor.
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crème de cassis
crème de cassis
This is a crème liqueur made with black currants and rum. It's very sweet, and often mixed with white wine to make kir.
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crème de cerise
This is a crème liqueur that has a cherry flavor.
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crème de chocolat
This is a crème liqueur that has a chocolate flavor.
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crème de cumin
This is a crème liqueur that's flavored with caraway seeds
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crème de fraise
crème de fraise
This is a crème liqueur that has a strawberry flavor.
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crème de framboise
crème de framboise
This is a crème liqueur that has a raspberry flavor.
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crème de griotte
crème de griotte
This is a crème liqueur that's flavored with sour Morello cherries
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crème de mandarine
This is a crème liqueur that has a mandarin orange flavor.
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crème de menthe
crème de menthe
This is a crème liqueur that has a peppermint flavor. It's used to make several mixed drinks, but many people like it all by itself as an after-dinner drink. Sometimes it's clear, but more often green, gold, or red food coloring is added.
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crème de mûre
crème de mûre
This is a crème liqueur that's flavored with blackberries.
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crème de myrtille
crème de myrtille
This is a crème liqueur that's flavored with blueberries.
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crème de noix
This is a crème liqueur that has a walnut flavor.
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crème de noyaux
This is a crème liqueur that has an almond flavor.
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crème de pêche
crème de pêche
This is a crème liqueur that's flavored with peaches.
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crème de prunelle
This is a crème liqueur that's flavored with sloe berries.
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crème de rose
This is a crème liqueur that's flavored with roses.
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crème de vanille
This is a crème liqueur that has a vanilla flavor.
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crème de violette
This is a crème liqueur that's flavored with violets. Crème d'Yvette = creme d'Yvette is a very sweet American brand.
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créme fraîche
créme fraîche
This slightly sour thick cream doesn't curdle when it's heated, so it's ideal for making cream sauces. It's also used for appetizers and as a dessert topping. To make your own: Warm one cup heavy cream to about 100°, then add one or two tablespoons of sour cream, cultured buttermilk, or plain yogurt (make sure you buy a brand that contains active cultures). Allow the mixture to sit at room temperature for at least nine hours before refrigerating.
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crème liqueurs
Despite the name, crème liqueurs contain no cream. Instead, they're liqueurs that have been heavily sweetened and have a thick, syrupy consistency. Don't confuse them with Irish cream liqueurs, which really are made with cream.
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