Vegetables Category

Vegetables

Vegetables is a catch-all category that includes many of the edible parts of a plant, like stems, roots, flowers, tubers, and leaves. Some biological fruits that aren't very sweet, like tomatoes, squash, peppers, eggplants, and beans, are considered by cooks to be vegetables.

flowering kale, flowering cabbage, flowering cole, ornamental kale
flowering kale
This is a beautiful cabbage used more often as a garnish than as a vegetable.
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fresh beans, shellies, shellouts, shelly beans, shuckies
fresh beans
Fresh beans appear in the summer and fall, and they're sweeter and more tender than dry beans. You don't need to soak them or cook them as long as dried beans, but they often need to be shelled before using. You can usually substitute them with dried beans pound for pound.
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fresh black-eyed pea, fresh black-eye bean, fresh black-eye pea
fresh black-eyed pea
In their fresh form, black-eyed peas are pale green and have a wonderful, nutty flavor. Unlike dried black-eyed peas, they don't need to be soaked, and they cook much faster. They arrive in markets during the late summer and early fall.
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fresh cranberry bean, fresh borlotti bean, fresh crab eye bean
fresh cranberry bean
These are available in the summer months.
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fresh fava bean, fresh broad bean, fresh butter bean, fresh English bean
fresh fava bean
Fresh fava beans are available in the summer and are much better tasting than canned, dried, or frozen ones. Young fava beans need only be shelled, but more mature beans should also be peeled to rid them of the tough, waxy skin that surrounds each bean. The best way to do this is to blanch the shelled beans for a minute in boiling water, plunge them into cold water, and pull off the skins. Select large fava beans that don't have black spots on them, Larger ones are the best. About 400 million people worldwide have favism, an enzyme deficiency. Eating fava beans can cause adverse symptoms in some of them.
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fresh lima bean, fresh butter bean, fresh Madagascar bean, fresh wax bean
fresh lima bean
These are exquisitely sweet and tender, as long as you get to them soon after they're picked. The freshest pods are brightly colored and snap crisply when you bend them. Fresh lima beans don't need to be soaked and you need only cook them about 15 minutes.
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fresh peas, shellies, shellouts, shellpeas, shuckies
fresh peas
Fresh peas are sweeter and more tender than their dry counterparts. To shell one, just pull down the string and squeeze the pod at the seams, then scrape out the peas and discard the pods. As with corn, freshness is crucial since peas begin converting their sugar into starch as soon as they're picked. The freshest pods are brightly colored and snap crisply when you bend them. Fresh peas don't need to be soaked and they cook fairly quickly.
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Fresno pepper, Fresno chile pepper, Fresno chili pepper
Fresno pepper
These are similar to jalapeno peppers, but with thinner walls. They're great in salsas. Green Fresnos are available in the summer. the hotter red ones come out in the fall.
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Fuerte avocado, Florida avocado
Fuerte avocado
This is in season from late fall through spring. It's not quite as buttery as the Hass avocado, but its flavor is excellent.
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fuzzy melon, Chi qua, fuzzy gourd, hairy cucumber, hairy melon, moqua, wax gourd
fuzzy melon
This sweet and mild squash has a fuzzy feel to it.
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Gaeta olive, Gyeta olive
Gaeta olives
These are small, purple Italian olives are either dry-cured (making them black and wrinkled) or brine-cured (making them dark purple and smooth-skinned).
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gai choy, Chinese mustard cabbage, Chinese mustard greens, Indian mustard
gai choy
Asian cooks like to pickle this, or else use it in soups or stir-fries. If you find gai choy too pungent to stir-fry, blanch it first in salted water.
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galangal, galanga, galangale, galingale, greater galangal, Java galangal
galangal
Look for this in Asian markets. It's sold fresh, frozen, dried, or powdered, but use the dried or powdered versions only in a pinch.
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garden cucumber, field-grown cucumbers, market cucumber, outdoor cucumber
garden cucumber
You can find these throughout the year at all but the most poorly stocked markets. The ones you find in supermarkets are usually waxed to hold in moisture and improve shelf-life--these should be peeled or at least scrubbed well before serving. Unwaxed cucumbers don't need to be peeled, but better cooks often do so since the peels tend to be thick and bitter. It's also a good idea to remove the seeds from these kinds of cucumbers; just cut them in half lengthwise and scrape them out. Select cukes that are firm, dark green, and rounded at the tips.
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garden eggs
garden eggs
These are tiny eggplants, the size of an egg or smaller. Their color ranges from white to greenish-yellow.
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garden pea, English pea, fresh pea, green pea, shell pea
garden pea
These appear in the summer months, and they're so sweet that it's well worth the trouble to shell them. Freshness is crucial, so look for brightly colored pods that are crisp enough to snap. Petits pois are a small and tender variety.
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garlic, California garlic, green garlic, Italian garlic, Mexican garlic
garlic
Almost every cuisine on our planet has found an important role for garlic. Europeans mince it raw and add it to salad dressings, or sauté it and use it to flavor their sauces. Asian cooks add it to to their stir-fries; Indian cooks to their curries; Hispanic cooks to meats and vegetables. And Americans have lately taken a fancy to roasting whole bulbs, and then spreading the garlic like a soft cheese on bread or crackers. Garlic's good for you, too. Researchers believe that garlic can bolster the immune system, lower blood pressure and prevent heart disease, and at least some people believe that it can ward off vampires and insects. The only downside is that raw or undercooked garlic tends to linger on the breath, though many people are more than willing to pay that price. Types of garlic include the mild green garlic, the purple-skinned Italian garlic and Mexican garlic, and the common white-skinned garlic = California garlic, which is the most pungent of all.
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garlic flakes, dehydrated minced garlic, dried garlic flakes
garlic flakes
When rehydrated in water, garlic flakes provide much of the flavor and texture of fresh garlic.
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garlic juice
garlic juice
These are sold in spray bottles or in small jars. Look for them in the spice section of larger supermarkets. To make your own: Strain the juice from a jar of minced or pressed garlic.
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garlic powder, powdered garlic
garlic powder
Garlic powder provides some of the flavor, but not the texture, of fresh garlic. It disperses well in liquids, so it's a good choice for marinades.
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gherkin cucumber
gherkin cucumber
These small, bumpy greed cucumbers are used to make Gherkin pickles or, if pickled while still small, cornichon pickles.
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ginger root, fresh ginger, geung, ginger, gingerroot, khing, shoga
ginger root
With its sweet yet pungent flavor, ginger has become a mainstay of many of the world's cuisines. European cooks like to use dried, ground ginger to flavor gingerbread and other baked goods. Asian and Indian cooks prefer their ginger fresh, and they use it in spicy sauces and stir-fries. Ginger not only tastes good, it's also believed to have medicinal properties, and people sometimes use it to soothe their upset stomachs and boost their energy. Ground ginger isn't a good substitute for fresh, but dried whole ginger will work in a pinch, as will the minced or puréed ginger that's sold in jars.
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globe squash, Ronde de Nice
globe squash
You can stuff these and bake them, or slice and sauté them.
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golden delicious squash
golden delicious squash
This is an orange-red variety of Hubbard squash
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golden nugget squash, oriental pumpkin
golden nugget squash
This has a pleasant flavor, but it doesn't have as much flesh as other squashes and the heavy rind makes it hard to cut before cooking. Select specimens that are heavy for their size, and that have a dull finish. Those with shiny rinds were probably picked too young, and won't be as sweet.
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granulated garlic
granulated garlic
Like garlic powder, granulated garlic provides the flavor, but not the texture, of fresh garlic. It disperses well in liquids.
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Greek black olives
Greek black olives
A generic black Greek olive is large, dark purple and brine-cured. Popular varieties include Kalamata, Amphissa, and Royal.
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Greek green olives
Greek green olives
Napfilion and Ionian olives are the most common types of green Greek olives.
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green bean, Baguio beans, French beans, snap bean, string bean
green bean
These are meant to be cooked and eaten, pods and all. They're best if they're steamed or stir-fried just until they're tender but still crisp. Select bright green beans that snap when broken in half. Their peak season is in the summer.
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green cabbage
green cabbage
Cabbage is quite versatile. You can cut it into chunks, boil it, and serve it with corned beef or other fatty meats. You can also use cooked leaves as wrappers for meat fillings, or shred raw ones for cole slaw. Select heavy heads of cabbage that have shiny leaves.
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green ginger, baby ginger, new ginger, pink ginger, spring ginger, stem ginger
green ginger
These pink-tipped, shiny pieces of young ginger are mild and usually don't need to be peeled. They're easy to find in Asian markets.
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green goddess eggplant
green goddess eggplant
This has a very mild flavor.
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green olives
green olives
Green olives are picked from the tree before they're completely ripened. The most common variety is the Manzanilla olive, which is often pitted and stuffed. Other green olives varieties include the Agrinion, Arauco, Arbequina, Atalanta, green Cerignola, cracked Provençal, Kura, Lucque, Nafplion, Picholine, Sevillano, and Sicilian.
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green onion, bunching onion, cebollitas, Chinese onion, cibol, scallion
green onion
These are onions that have small bulbs and long green stalks. They're usually eaten raw, but you can also grill or sauté them. Some people also use the term green onions to refer to onion tops, shallot tops and young leeks.
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green tomato
green tomato
These are picked before they turn red. Southerners like to fry them.
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guajillo chili , dried mirasol chile, chile Guajillo
guajillo chili
One of the more popular Mexican chilies, the guajillo (or dried mirasol chili) has a fruity flavor and medium heat (Scoville heat scale of 2,500 to 5,000 SHU). It's smooth, shiny, and reddish-brown, and it has a tough skin, so it needs to be soaked longer than other chiles. These are commonly used for marinades and adobos.
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guero pepper, caloro, caribe, chile guero, goldspike, Sante Fe grande
guero pepper
These are moderately hot.
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habanero - dried, habañero chili, habañero pepper
habanero - dried
Don't confuse dried habaneros with the fresh version, which goes by the same name. These extremely hot chiles are wrinkled and orange.
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habanero - fresh, habanero pepper
habanero - fresh
These extremely hot orange chiles have a fruity flavor. They're best in the summertime.
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hair vegetable, black flossy moss, black moss, fat choy, hair seaweed
hair vegetable
The Chinese add this to soups and use it as a garnish. Look for it in Chinese markets and pharmacies. It grows in the Gobi Desert.
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hardneck garlic
Hardneck garlic retains the stalk in the center of the bulb. They tend to have stronger flavors and do not store as long as softneck garlic. Hardneck garlics include purple stripe, rocambole, porcelain, and others.
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haricot verts, French bean, French filet bean, French green bean
haricot verts
This is a very thin variety of green bean that's crisp, tender, and expensive. Don't confuse this with the haricot bean, which is a dry bean.
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