All Ingredients

tocino
tocino
Tocino is Spanish for bacon, but in the Philippines, it refers to cured pork that's been marinated in a sweet red sauce. Look for it in Asian markets.
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toddy palm seeds, loog than, Plalmyra plam seeds, tad gola
toddy palm seeds
These are seeds from the toddy or jaggery palm. Sap from the same tree is used to make jaggery (a kind of sugar), wine, and vinegar. You have to cook them before you can eat them. People in Indian and Southeast Asia roast and split the seeds, then suck out the yellow gelatinous pulp inside. It's available frozen or canned in Indian and Southeast Asian markets. Be careful if you pick your own: the red fruit surrounding the seeds contains oxalic acid, which can burn your skin and do even more damage if eaten.
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tofu, bean curd, doufu, soya cheese, soybean curd
tofu
Tofu is cheap, high in protein, low in fat, and very versatile. You can eat it raw or cooked, but it's bland by itself and tastes best if it's allowed to absorb other flavors. There are several varieties of raw tofu, each with different moisture contents. Silken and soft tofu are relatively moist, and best suited for making shakes, dips, and dressings. Regular tofu has some of the moisture drained away, and it's best for scrambling or using like cheese in casseroles. Firm, extra-firm, and pressed tofus are even drier, so they absorb other flavors better and hold their shape in stir-fries and on the grill. Tofu is also available smoked, pickled, flavored, baked, and deep-fat fried.
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tofu noodles, bean curd noodles, beancurd noodles, gan si, soy noodles
tofu noodles
These chewy noodles look like a pack of rubber bands, but they're made from compressed tofu and packed with protein and nutrients. They're usually served in salads, soups, or stir-fries. Look for them in the refrigerated or frozen foods section of Asian markets. Dried tofu noodles are also available; before using, soak them in water mixed with baking soda until they soften, then rinse. Don't confuse these with bean curd skin noodles, which are darker and chewier.
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tofu sour cream
This made with tofu, and it's lower in fat and more nutritious than ordinary sour cream. Look for it in health food stores.
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tofurky
tofurky
A tofu and seitan substitute.
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Tokaj wine
Ordinary Tokay table wine is mediocre, but some Tokay grapes are affected by Botrytis cinerea, a fungus that pokes holes in their skins and makes them shrivel on the vine. This concentrates the sweetness and makes for an exquisite dessert wine. Look for bottles labeled Tokay Aszú, the Hungarian name for botrytised Tokay wine.
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Tolosana bean, Prince bean, Spanish Tolosana bean
Tolosana bean
These beans are especially good in seafood dishes.
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tomatillo, Chinese lantern plants, fresadilla, ground tomato, husk tomato
tomatillo
Tomatillos look like small green tomatoes encased in a papery husk, though they're not true tomatoes.They're pleasantly tart, and principally used to make Mexican salsas, particularly salsa verde. They're good raw, but many cooks cook them briefly in order to enhance their flavor. Frozen tomatillos are good substitutes for fresh. Store fresh ones in the refrigerator for up to a month, or cook them and freeze them.
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tomato
tomato
With their rich flavor and mild acidity, tomatoes have worked their way into thousands of recipes. You can eat them raw in salads, salsas, or sandwiches, cook them to make sauces, stuff them and bake them, or grill them on skewers with other vegetables. Summertime is the the best season for tomatoes; those sold at other times of the year are often bland. Indeed, better cooks often prefer canned tomatoes for their sauces over fresh out-of-season tomatoes. Select tomatoes that are brightly colored, smooth skinned, and heavy for their size. Don't refrigerate tomatoes--it ruins their flavor. To learn about different varieties of tomatoes, click here.
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tomato juice
tomato juice
To make your own: See the Tomato Juice Recipe posted on Recipesource.com.
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tomato paste
tomato paste
Tomato past is made by reducing tomatoes to a thick paste and filtering out the skins and seeds.
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tomato puree
tomato puree
Tomato purée is thicker than tomato sauce but thinner than tomato paste.
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tomato sauce
tomato sauce
Tomato sauce is thinner than tomato paste and tomato puree. In Australia what Americans call catsup is often called tomato sauce.
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tomatoes canned
tomatoes canned
Canned tomatoes include whole peeled, diced or crushed. They usually contain seeds. They may need to be strained to remove the seeds and extra water.
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Tomme Crayeuse cheese
Tomme Crayeuse cheese
This soft French cow's milk cheese is rich and buttery. Don't eat the rind.
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Tomme de Savoie cheese, tomme de montagne
Tomme de Savoie cheese
This is a mild and pleasant French cow's milk cheese that's semi-soft when young, firmer when aged.
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tongue, beef tongue, calf tongue, calf's tongue, ox tongue, veal tongue
tongue
Cooked tongue is lean, meaty, and quite versatile; it works well in sandwiches, tacos, and casseroles. To prepare it, boil it in a stockpot, then plunge it in cold water and peel off the skin and trim the base of gristle and fat. You can then cut it into thin slices and serve it hot or cold. Since beef tongue = ox tongue and calf's tongue = calf tongue = veal tongue are larger and easier to slice, they tend to be pricier. Many markets also carry lamb tongue (pictured at left) and pork tongue. Different tongues can be used interchangeably in recipes though their cooking times vary according to their size.
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tongue loaf, tongue sausage
tongue loaf
Delis often stock loaves of pork, lamb, veal, or beef tongues that have been cooked, pressed, jellied, and/or smoked.
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tongues of fire bean
tongues of fire bean
This bean is a close relative of the cranberry bean. Despite its name, it's not hot at all.
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tonkatsu sauce, katsu sauce
tonkatsu sauce
This Japanese condiment is used to make yakisoba. Bull Dog is a popular brand.
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toor, arhar, tur, tuvar
toor
These lentils are tan when whole, but they're usually sold skinned and split, which reveals their yellow interiors. They're popular in Southern and Western India. Look for them in Indian markets.
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toor dal, arhar dal, tur dal, tuvar dal, yellow lentils
toor dal
Whole toor lentils are yellow with tan jackets, but they're usually sold skinned and split. They have a mild, nutty flavor, and they're often cooked as a side dish or ground into flour. They're sometimes sold with an oily coating, which you should rinse off. Look for them at Indian markets.
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torchio
torchio
These pasta shapes resemble torches, the better to scoop up chunky sauces.
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tortelli, anolini
tortelli
These are circles of 2-inch diameter pasta that are stuffed and then folded over.
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tortellini
tortellini
These are circles of pasta that are stuffed with a meat or cheese filling, and then folded into little hats. A larger version is called tortelloni.
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tortelloni
tortelloni
These are circles of pasta that are stuffed with a meat or cheese filling, and then folded into little hats. A smaller version is called tortellini.
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tortiglioni
tortiglioni
This is a tubular Italian pasta that's often served with chunky sauces or in casseroles.
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tortilla
tortilla
These thin wraps are used to make countless Mexican dishes. Corn tortillas have little or no fat, and they're the preferred tortilla for making tacos and enchiladas. Flour tortillas are softer, higher in fat, and more pliable. They're traditionally used to make burritos, chimichangas, fajitas, flautas, and quesadillas, though some cooks use them to make everything from spring rolls to peanut butter sandwiches. Before filling tortillas, cook them briefly on a hot, dry frying pan or wrap them in damp paper towels and heat them in the microwave. Store uncooked tortillas in the refrigerator or freezer.
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tortilla chips
tortilla chips
These are tortilla wedges that have been deep-fried or baked. They're often served with Southwestern-style dips, like salsa and guacamole.
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Toulouse sausage
Toulouse sausage
This exquisite French sausage is usually made with pork, smoked bacon, wine, and garlic. It's a great sausage for a cassoulet. Cook it before serving.
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touristenwurst
touristenwurst
This is a pork and beef soft salami ring.
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treacle, molasses
treacle
Treacle is the British version of molasses, and it's a close substitute. Varieties include golden syrup=light treacle, which resemble light molasses, and dark treacle = black treacle, which is more similar to dark molasses.
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trefoil, Low hop clover
trefoil
Named for the three leaves that sprout from each stem, trefoil has a crunchy texture and aromatic flavor. It's great in salads or as a garnish in soups.
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trenette, trinette
trenette
This is a type of Italian ribbon pasta that's thinner than fettuccine and linguine. It's traditionally served with a pesto sauce. Don't confuse it with trennette, a small rod with a triangular cross-section.
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trenne
trenne
This Italian pasta is triangular, and cut into short lengths. It's good with chunky sauces or in casseroles.
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trennette
trennette
This triangular Italian pasta is similar to trenne, only smaller. Don't confuse this with trenette, which is a long ribbon of pasta.
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tripe, bible tripe, Blanket tripe, book tripe, flat tripe, honeycomb tripe
tripe
Tripe is the name given to the stomachs of various animals, but most recipes that call for it intend for you to use beef tripe. Cows have four stomachs, and the first three yield merchantable tripe. Blanket tripe = plain tripe = flat tripe = smooth tripe comes from the first stomach, honeycomb tripe (pictured at left) and pocket tripe from the second, and book tripe = bible tripe = leaf tripe from the third. Honeycomb tripe is meatier and more tender than the other kinds and considered to be the best, but all these kinds of tripe can be used interchangeably in recipes. Tripe is almost always sold bleached and partially cooked. This saves a lot of work, since unprocessed tripe would need to be cooked for many, many hours to make it tender enough to chew.
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triple sec
Even though the name means "triple dry," this is a relatively sweet orange-flavored liqueur.
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triple-crème cheese, triple-cream cheese
triple-crème cheese
These cheeses are the gelatos of the cheese word--incredibly creamy and decadent, thanks to a high butterfat content that comes from tripling the cream. They have roughly twice the fat as a typical Brie or Camembert, but they're much more buttery and rich. Some triple-crèmes are fresh, like mascarpone. Others are soft-ripened, like Boursault, Castello Blue, Brillat Savarin, and Explorateur.
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tripolini, little bows
tripolini
Some pasta producers use the name tripolini to describe tiny bows which commemorate the Italian conquest of Tripoli. Some use it to describe long ribbons that are similar to fettuccine, but ruffled along one edge.
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Triscuit®
Triscuit®
These crunchy crackers are made of woven strands of whole wheat. They're often used as a base for appetizers, though some devotees eat them straight. Reduced fat and low sodium versions are available.
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triticale
triticale
Triticale is a wheat-rye cross that's higher in protein than either of its parents. It has a pleasant enough wheat-like flavor, but it's prized mostly for its hardiness and ability to grow in poor soils.
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triticale berries
triticale berries
Triticale berries are similar to wheat berries, though they also have a subtle rye flavor.
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