All Ingredients

veal loin cuts, middle meats, veal loin
veal loin cuts
The most buttery cuts of all come from the loin, but you'll pay dearly for them.
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veal loin roast, rolled loin roast of veal
veal loin roast
This is a magnificent roast, but it's very expensive. If you get it boned, rolled, and tied, it's called a rolled loin roast of veal.
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veal rib chop
veal rib chop
This is cut from a rib roast, and comes either bone-in or boneless.
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veal rib cuts, rack of veal, veil ribs
veal rib cuts
The ribs are usually cut into chops, but you can also roast the entire rack of veal, or tie two or three racks together to form a crown roast of veal.
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veal rib roast
A rib roast is often cut into tender rib chops, but some people roast it intact or tie two or three rib roasts together to form a crown roast of veal. A hotel rack includes the connected rib racks from both sides of the animal. Be careful not to overcook veal; since it isn't very fatty it tends to dry out easily. Rib roasts are sold either with or without bones.
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veal riblets, veal breast riblets
veal riblets
These are similar to beef short ribs. They're usually braised or used in stews.
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veal round steak
Steaks can be braised or, if they're cut thin, pan-fried.
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veal rump roast
The bone-in or standing rump roast is a tasty roast, but it contains a lot of bone and it's tricky to carve. Butchers will bone, roll, and tie a rump roast into a rolled veal rump roast = veal roast boneless = rump of veal boneless = veal rump roast boneless. Rump roasts can be braised or roasted.
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veal shank
veal shank
Portions of both the fore shank and the hind shank are sold as shank bones. They're rich in gelatinous substances, so they're excellent for making stocks, soups, and osso buco.
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veal shank half of leg
veal shank half of leg
This is the lower portion of the leg, minus the hind shank and hock. It has more waste than a rump roast or center cut, but it's very flavorful.
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veal shoulder, veal shoulder cuts
veal shoulder
The cuts here are more economical, since the meat is tougher and often interlaced with bone and connective tissue. Butchers usually bone, roll, and tie the shoulder to make a rolled roast, but they sometimes also cut the shoulder into smaller roasts and steaks.
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veal sirloin chop
This is a lean steak cut from a sirloin roast.
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veal sirloin roast, boneless veal sirloin roast, veal leg sirloin roast
veal sirloin roast
You can buy this with the bone in, but it's very tricky to carve. Many people therefore opt for the boneless veal sirloin roast, which is boned, rolled, and tied. A steak cut from a sirloin roast is called a sirloin veal chop.
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veal steak, veal round steak, veal sirloin chop
veal steak
Two cuts often go by this name: the veal sirloin chop and the veal round steak.
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veal stew meat, stew veal, veal for stew
veal stew meat
These are relatively tough chunks of meat that need to be braised or cooking slowly in liquid to become properly tender.
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veal stock
veal stock
Veal bones have more collagen than beef bones, and so veal stock is thicker and richer.
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vegetable bouillon cubes
vegetable bouillon cubes
One boullion cube weighs 0.14 ounce and makes one cup of broth.
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vegetable oil spray
vegetable oil spray
Pam is a well-known brand.
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vegetable yeast extract
Includes: Marmite, Vegemite, and Promite.
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vegetarian bacon, soy bacon, tofu bacon
vegetarian bacon
Many meat analogs are disappointing, but some variations on vegetarian bacon are surprisingly tasty. See the recipes for Vegan Bacon, Tempeh Bacon, or Tofu Bacon posted on www.vegweb.com.
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vegetarian cheeses
When making cheese, milk is curdled with the help of rennet, an enzyme that occurs naturally in the stomach of animals. Many vegetarians object to eating cheese made with natural rennet, since its production involves the slaughter of animals. Fortunately, a lot of fine cheese is now made with vegetable rennet, which is derived from fungi, bacteria, or plants. Unfortunately, the type of rennet used isn't always marked on the cheese label. Some stores help out by adding their own labels.
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vegetarian gelling agents
Vegetarians use these instead of gelatin, which is derived from the bones and tissues of animals. The most popular are agar and carrageen, both of which are derived from seaweed.
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venison
venison
The term venison applies to deer meat, elk meat, moose meat, caribou meat, and reindeer meat, all of which can be used interchangeably. Venison is very lean, so it's important not to overcook it. The best cuts are from the back strap, or loin area. If you want to tone down the gamy flavor, marinate it in milk or add some vinegar to the sauce.
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verjus, verjuice
verjus
A medieval ingredient that's making a comeback, verjus is a sour juice made from unripened red or white grapes. Vinegars in salad dressings sometimes create off-tastes in the wines that accompany a meal. Verjus doesn't, so it's a good substitute for vinegar if you're planning to serve an expensive wine with dinner. Some people also mix it with sparkling water and ice to make a sophisticated non-alcoholic drink.After the bottle is opened, store verjus in the refrigerator, where it will keep for about a month. If you can't use it that fast, pour it into ice cube trays, freeze, then store the cubes in a plastic bag in the freezer. Though becoming more popular, verjus is still hard to find. Look for it in gourmet specialty shops.
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vermicelli
vermicelli
Vermicelli (Italian for "little worms") is similar to spaghetti, only with very thin strands. Serve it with very light sauces, or break up the rods and serve the pieces in a broth.
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vermicelloni
vermicelloni
This Italian pasta is a thick version of vermicelli, that's often served with hearty meat sauces. It's hard to find in the United States.
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vermouth
vermouth
This is a fortified wine that's heavily flavored with sugar, herbs, roots, flowers, and spices. It's sometimes served as an apéritif, but it's better known as a key ingredient in many cocktails, including martinis and Manhattans. It's also used to perk up sauces, especially those that accompany seafood. There are two main types: dry vermouth and sweet vermouth. Noilly Prat and Martini & Rossi are well-respected brands.
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vesiga
Vesiga is the spinal cord of a European sturgeon. It is considered a delicacy in Russia. Coulibiac is a Russian dish that features vesiga.
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Vienna sausage, Vienna-style frankfurter
Vienna sausage
These small, squat hot dogs come in cans. They're often used to make hors d'oeuvres.
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Vietnamese noodles
Vietnamese noodles
The Vietnamese are fond of rice noodles, which range in size from the slender banh hoi (rice vermicelli) to bun (thin rice sticks) to banh pho (medium rice sticks). They also use slender bean threads made from mung bean starch (which they call bun tao or sometimes mien), and Chinese egg noodles.
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vine tomato, vine-ripened tomato
vine tomato
For best flavor, tomatoes should stay on the vine until they're fully ripened. This is a tall order for growers, who prefer to pick tomatoes while they're still green and sturdy, and then gas them with ethylene until they turn red. Vine tomatoes, on the other hand, are picked after they begin to "break" or turn red, which allows them to develop fuller flavor. Expect to pay more for the special handling required to bring these to market.
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vinegar
vinegar
Cooks use vinegar to make pickles, deglaze pans, marinate meats, and add tang to vinaigrettes, sauces, and even desserts. Vinegars are made by adding a bacteria called Acetobacter aceti to diluted wine, ale, or fermented fruits or grains. This creates acetic acid, which gives the liquid a sour flavor. Unopened, most vinegars will last for about two years in a cool, dark pantry. For tips on how to use vinegar, and to learn about different varieties of vinegar, click here.
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Viognier
Viognier
This assertive white wine from California exudes a complex perfume of flowers and fruit. It's expensive and hard to find, but it's delicious with seafood and poultry.
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violet syrup
violet syrup
To make your own: See the recipe for Violet Syrup on RecipeSource.
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vodka
vodka
This flavorless, colorless liquor is a great mixer, since it blends unobtrusively with other ingredients. Some prefer to drink it straight, poured from bottles they store in the freezer. Since vodka is virtually flavorless, the differences between the brands are all but imperceptible to the mortal tongue. Buy the cheapest brand if you're using the vodka in mixed drinks. Flavored vodkas also are available; here the differences in quality may be more noticeable.
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Vouvray
Vouvray
This is a slightly sweet French white wine made with Chenin blanc grapes.
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Wakame, alaria
Wakame
This has a sweet flavor, and it's rich in calcium. It's often rehydrated and then added to miso soup or sautéed as a side dish. Dry wakame can also be toasted and crumbled over salads and other dishes. It's very high in calcium.
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walnut, English walnuts, Persian walnuts, royal walnuts
walnut
Walnuts are rich and flavorful, and cooks like to use them in everything from fudge to salads. Markets usually carry English walnuts = royal walnuts = Persian walnuts. Less common are black walnuts, which are much more flavorful but harder to shell. To roast, put shelled walnuts on a baking pan and in bake them in a 325° oven, stirring occasionally, until they're slightly golden, about ten minutes. After you remove the nuts from the oven, rub them vigorously with a towel so as to remove as much of their bitter skins as possible. Fresh walnuts are available year-round, but they're best in the fall. Since they're high in fat and therefore prone to rancidity, it's best to store them in the refrigerator or freezer.
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walnut liqueur, Nocciole, Nocello, Nocino
walnut liqueur
Popular brands iinclude Nocciole, Nocello, and Nocino.
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