Accompaniments

Accompaniments
Includes condiments, pickles, and olives
Agrinion olive
Agrinion olive
This is a large, green Greek olive with very tender flesh.
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Aleppo olive
This is a black, dry-cured Middle Eastern olive that's hard to find in the United States.
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Alphonso olive, Alfonso olive
Alphonso olive
This large Chilean olive is cured in a wine or wine vinegar solution, which gives it a beautiful dark purple color and tart flavor. Its flesh is very tender and slightly bitter.
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aluminum foil, tin foil
aluminum foil
This is an excellent all-purpose wrapper, able to withstand both heat and cold. It's the best choice if you're wrapping foods for freezer storage, since it works better than plastic wrap at preventing moisture loss.
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Amphissa olive, Amfisa olive, Amfissa olive
Amphissa olive
These are dark purple Greek olives that are hard to find in the U.S. They're great for snacking.
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anchovy paste
anchovy paste
Supermarkets carry tubes of this, usually near the canned tuna.
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apple butter, black butter, Irish black butter
apple butter
Apple butter isn't made from real butter. Instead, it's made by cooking apples until the sugar in them caramelizes, turning the sauce a rich brown color. It's used as a spread, and also as a fat-free substitute in many baking recipes.
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apple jelly
apple jelly
You can use this like any other jelly, but it's often used as a glaze when roasting pork.
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applesauce, apple sauce
applesauce
Applesauce is a purée made from cooked apples. It's often flavored with sugar, lemon juice, and spices like cinnamon and allspice. It's often served as an accompaniment to pork, sausages, and potato pancakes. It can also be used as a fat substitute in baking.
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Arauco olive
Arauco olive
These are large green Spanish olives flavored with rosemary.
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Arbequina olive
Arbequina olive
These are tiny green Spanish olives with a mild, smoky flavor. They're hard to find in the U.S.
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Asian barbecue sauce
Asian barbecue sauce
This is made with oil, soy sauce, and other seasonings. Don't confuse it with the much sweeter American barbecue sauce.
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Atalanta olive
Atalanta olive
This is a muddy-green Greek olive with soft flesh.
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bamboo leaves
bamboo leaves
Southeast Asians use these to wrap and tie rice packets before steaming. They're hard to find fresh, but Asian markets often carry dried leaves in plastic bags. Soak them in warm water before using to prevent them from cracking.
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banana catsup
available in Asian food stores.
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banana leaves
banana leaves
People in the tropics use these huge leaves to line cooking pits and to wrap everything from pigs to rice. The leaves impart a subtle anise fragrance to food and protect it while it's cooking. Frozen leaves--once thawed--work just fine. Boil the leaves before using them to keep them from cracking. Look for banana leaves among the frozen foods in Asian, Hispanic, or specialty markets.
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barbecue sauce, barbeque sauce, BBQ sauce
barbecue sauce
See the Kansas City BBQ Sauce recipe, Yet Another BBQ Sauce recipe, both posted by RecipeSource.com.
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bean sauce, bean paste, brown bean paste, brown bean sauce, mo yuen shih
bean sauce
This salty brown sauce is made from fermented soybeans, and is available in cans or jars. If you buy it in a can, transfer it into a jar. It can then be stored indefinitely in the refrigerator. Chinese bean sauce isn't as salty as Thai bean sauce.
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black bean sauce
black bean sauce
This is made from fermented black beans. A variation is hot black bean sauce, which has chile paste added, and black bean sauce with garlic. See the Asian Black Bean Sauce posting on RecipeSource.com.
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black currant jelly
black currant jelly
Black currant jelly is sweeter than more common red currant jelly.
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black olives, ripe olives
black olives
These are olives that have been allowed to ripen on the tree. American recipes that call for black olives are probably referring to the Mission olive. Other varieties of black olives are the Aleppo, Alphonso, Amphissa, black Cerignola, Gaeta, black Greek, Kalamata, Ligurian, Lugano, Moroccan dry-cured, Niçoise, Nyons, Ponentine, and Royal.
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borage, starflower
borage
Borage is best known for its attractive blue flowers, but Europeans sometimes use the leaves as an herb in salads and soups. Borage has a mild flavor that's been likened to that of cucumbers. The leaves are covered with prickly, throat-catching hairs, so it's best to either blanch them or chop them finely before serving them.
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candied angelica
candied angelica
These are used to make decorative flower stems on cakes.
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candied chestnuts, marrons glacés
candied chestnuts
A French specialty, these are whole chestnuts that are candied in a sugar syrup. They're used to make various desserts.
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candied ginger
candied ginger
Candied ginger is ginger that is stored in a sugary syrup, but the name is also sometimes used for crystallized ginger, which is ginger that's been cooked in syrup, then dried out and rolled in sugar. The two are often used interchangeably.
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caper berry
caper berry
Caper berries are large capers. They're sometimes used instead of green olives to garnish martinis.
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capers
capers
Capers are pickled flower buds, and very salty. You can get them pickled in brine (top photo) or salted (bottom). Look for them in the pickle section of your grocery store, or in delis. The smallest ones are more expensive, and more highly esteemed. Rinse them before using.
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carnation
carnation
Carnations have a peppery flavor. While they're edible, some people may have an allergic reaction to them.
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Castelvetrano olive, dolce olives
Castelvetrano olive
These are bright-green olives from Sicily are sweet and mild.
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Cerignola olive, Bella di Cerignola
Cerignola olive
These sweet Italian olives are large enough to stuff. Black Cerignolas are softer than green Cerignolas.
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chee hou sauce, che hau sauce, chu hou paste
chee hou sauce
This braising sauce is made from soybeans, garlic, and ginger. Look for it in the condiments section of Asian markets
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chile paste, Asian chile paste, chile paste with garlic, chili garlic sauce
chile paste
This is a blend of hot chile peppers, garlic, oil, and salt that's commonly used in Asian cuisine. Includes: Chinese chile (or chili) paste = Szechuan chile (or chili) paste = Sichuan chile (or chili) paste = chile paste with garlic, Korean chile paste, and Vietnamese chile paste = tuong ot toi Vietnam = prik kaeng, which is hotter than the Chinese chile paste. See also separate entries for these other chile pastes: nam prik pao, chile bean paste, sambal oelek, and sambal bajak.
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