Accompaniments

Accompaniments
Includes condiments, pickles, and olives
chile verde sauce
chile verde sauce
This is a mild green sauce often used to stew pork
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chili bean paste
chili bean paste
This reddish-brown sauce is made from fermented soybeans and hot chilies. It's very hot.
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Chinese pickle
Chinese pickle
includes preserved Sichuan mustard greens, preserved Sichuan kohlrabi, snow pickle = red-in-snow, and salted cabbage = winter pickle.
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cloudberry preserves
cloudberry preserves
These preserves are sweet and somewhat mild. Look for them in Scandinavian markets.
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coconut egg jam
coconut egg jam
Southeast Asians spread this exquisite jam on toast, but it would also be great on ice cream. Look for small cans of it in Asian markets. Visit the Coconut Egg Jam recipe page, or the Kaya, Traditional Coconut Jam page.
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corn husks
corn husks
Hispanic cooks use these, both fresh and dried, to wrap tamales before steaming them. Before using, soak the husks in hot water for about 30 minutes to make them more pliable.
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cornichon
cornichon
This is a small pickle that's flavored with dill, tarragon, and other herbs and spices. It's a heavenly accompaniment to pâté.
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cracked Provencal
These aromatic green olives are marinated in a solution with herbes de Provence.
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cranberry sauce
cranberry sauce
This is a classic accompaniment to Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. It's made of cranberries that have been cooked with sugar and other flavorings, like orange zest, ginger, port, or maple syrup.
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crystallized ginger
crystallized ginger
This is fresh ginger that has been cooked in a sugar solution and then coated with sugar. It's similar to candied ginger, and the two are often used interchangeably.
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dianthus
dianthus
These have a clove-like flavor. Some people may have an alergic reaction to dianthus.
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Dijon mustard
Dijon mustard
Grey Poupon and French's are well-regarded brands. See the Dijon Mustard recipe posting on Recipesource.com.
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dumpling wrappers
dumpling wrappers
These thin round wrappers are used to make the delicate dumplings that are so popular at dim sum restaurants. They're made to be stuffed and steamed, but they're not sturdy enough to be fried. While assembling the dumplings, keep the stack of wrappers moist by covering them with a damp towel. You can seal the dumplings with a "glue" made with cornstarch and water. Look for fresh or frozen wrappers in Asian markets. Store them in the refrigerator or freezer, but let them come to room temperature before using.
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dwen jang
dwen jang
This is a salty Korean bean paste.
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egg roll wrapers
egg roll wrapers
The Chinese use these dough squares to make deep-fried egg rolls. While assembling the egg rolls, keep the stack of wrappers moist by covering them with a damp towel. You can seal the rolls with a "glue" made with cornstarch and water. Look for fresh wrappers in Asian markets and many supermarkets. Store them in the refrigerator or freezer, but let them come to room temperature before using.
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empanada wrappers
empanada wrappers
Hispanic cooks wrap these six-inch diameter rounds of dough around sweet or savory fillings, and then bake or fry them. Look for them among the frozen foods in Hispanic markets.
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empeltre olive
empeltre olive
These Spanish black olives are soaked in sherry.
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fig leaf
fig leaf
These are great for wrapping delicately flavored foods before grilling them.
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fish sauce
fish sauce
a Filipino fish sauce that isn't as highly regarded as the Vietnamese or Thai versions, and shottsuru, a Japanese fish sauce. Red Boat, a Vietnamese fish sauce is thought to be very similar to what the ancient Romans called garum.
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Gaeta olive
Gaeta olive
These are small, purple Italian olives are either dry-cured (making them black and wrinkled) or brine-cured (making them dark purple and smooth-skinned).
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gherkin
gherkin
Gherkins are pickles made from smaller cucumbers, and tend to be crunchier than, say, dill pickles. They can be sweet or sour.
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ginger jam
ginger jam
Look for this in Asian grocery stores.
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glace cherries
glace cherries
red, green and yellow versions.
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grape leaves
grape leaves
Greeks stuff these with ground lamb and rice to make dolmades, but they're used elsewhere to make pickles and beds for food. They're hard to find fresh in markets, but you can often find them in cans or jars. Trim the stems and rinse off the brine before using. To make your own: Plunge grape leaves (that haven't been sprayed with harmful chemicals) for one minute in boiling, salted water (2 teaspoons pickling salt per quart), then drain.
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Greek black olives
Greek black olives
A generic black Greek olive is large, dark purple and brine-cured. Popular varieties include Kalamata, Amphissa, and Royal.
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Greek green olives
Greek green olives
Napfilion and Ionian olives are the most common types of green Greek olives.
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green olives
green olives
Green olives are picked from the tree before they're completely ripened. The most common variety is the Manzanilla olive, which is often pitted and stuffed. Other green olives varieties include the Agrinion, Arauco, Arbequina, Atalanta, green Cerignola, cracked Provençal, Kura, Lucque, Nafplion, Picholine, Sevillano, and Sicilian.
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Gyeta olive
Gyeta olive
These are small, black Italian olives are either dry-cured (making them black and wrinkled) or brine-cured (making them dark purple and smooth-skinned).
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gyoza wrappers
gyoza wrappers
The Japanese use these round wrappers to make pork-stuffed dumplings similar to Chinese potstickers. Western cooks sometimes use them to make ravioli.
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