Accompaniments Category

Accompaniments
Includes condiments, pickles, and olives
Moroccan dry-cured olive, Moroccan oil-cured olive, Moroccan salt-cured olive
Moroccan dry-cured olives
These are shriveled black olives that are somewhat bitter. They're best used for cooking rather than snacking.
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muscadine jelly
Made from muscadine grapes, this is a redder, tarter version of grape jelly.
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mustard, prepared
mustard, prepared
Includes: Chinese mustard, Creole mustard, and Dijon mustard.
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Nafplion green olive, Nafpelion, Nafphlion
Nafplion green olives
These are green, brine-cured Greek olives. They're somewhat salty.
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nam prik, nam phrik, nam phrik pao
nam prik
This is a general Thai term for dipping sauces.
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nam prik pao
This paste is made from chilies, onions, sugar, shrimp paste, fish sauce, and sometimes tamarind. It's sold in jars, and comes in different strengths, ranging from hot to mild.
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Nicoise olive, Niçoise olive
Nicoise olives
A key ingredient in Salade Niçoise, these small purplish-black olives have a distinctive sour flavor. They're great in tapenades.
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nuoc cham, Nu?c ch? m, Vietnamese dipping sauce, Vietnamese hot sauce
nuoc cham
Vietnam dipping sauce. It has a fish sauce base.
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Nyon olive
Nyon olives
These black olives from France are salt-cured, which makes them wrinkly and more bitter than standard lye-cured American black olives.
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Olives
Olives
A staple of Mediterranean cuisines, olives are most often eaten out of hand, though cooks also use them to flavor everything from pizzas to martinis. Raw olives must be cured before they can be eaten, and the curing medium--usually lye, brine, or salt--affects their flavor and texture. So too does the olive's degree of ripeness when it's picked. Green olives are picked while unripe, which makes them denser and more bitter than brown or black olives, which stay on the tree until fully ripened. Olives become bitter if they're cooked too long, so always add them to hot dishes at the last minute. Opened cans or jars of olives should be refrigerated, but some olives can be stored at room temperature if they're submerged in brine or olive oil.
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orange marmalade, marmalade, Orange
orange marmalade
This is made by boiling the fruit and peel of oranges with sugar, pectin, and water. It manages to be bitter, sour, and sweet all at once, which many people find delightful.
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oyster sauce
oyster sauce
This Cantonese dipping sauce is both sweet and salty. Look for bottles of it in Asian markets and large supermarkets.
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papaya leaves
papaya leaves
Wrapping meats in these leaves helps tenderize them.
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parchment paper, baking pan liner paper, baking paper, baking parchment
parchment paper
This is a heavy, silicone-coated paper that's used to line pans so that candies and baked goods won't stick. It's an expensive alternative to waxed paper, but it's less sticky, so it's a good choice if you're making gooey items. Parchment paper is also wrapped around foods to be cooked en papillote, or formed into cones for cake decorating. Specialty cooking stores and larger supermarkets often carry rolls or sheets of it. Paper grocery bags are sometimes recommended as a substitute for parchment paper, but it's not advisable to use them. Grocery bags will ignite at 450 degrees, and that they may have been treated with unsafe chemicals.
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piccalilli relish, green tomato relish
piccalilli relish
This goes especially well with ham.
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Picholine olive
Picholine olives
Picholines are green, torpedo-shaped olives that are brine-cured. Those made in Provence are marinated with coriander and herbes de Provence, while American picholines are soaked in citric acid. They make great martini olives.
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pickled asparagus
pickled asparagus
To make your own: See the Pickled Asparagus recipe on RecipeSource.com.
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pickled beets
pickled beets
To make your own: See the Pickled Beets recipe on RecipeSource.com.
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pickled carrots
pickled carrots
To make your own: See the Pickled Carrots recipe on RecipeSource.com.
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pickled cauliflower
pickled cauliflower
To make your own: See the Pickled Cauliflower recipe posted by the Internet Che.
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pickled eggs
pickled eggs
To make your own: See the Pickled Eggs recipe on RecipeSource.com.
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pickled ginger, gari
pickled ginger
See the Japanese Rosy Pickled Ginger posting on RecipeSource.com.
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pickled nasturtium buds
To make your own: See the Homemade Capers recipe in the Internet Chef's Recipe Archive.
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pickled okra
pickled okra
To make your own: See the Pickled Okra recipe on RecipeSource.com.
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pickled onions
pickled onions
http://www.foodsubs.com/Photos/pickledonions.jpg
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pickled string beans
pickled string beans
To make your own: See the Pickled String Beans recipe posted on RecipeSource.com.
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pil pil sauce
pil pil sauce
Pil pil is a basque sauce made from skin-on salted cod, olive oil, garlic and chili peppers. After cooking, the fish is removed and the reminder emulsified into a sauce. The pil pil sauce is them poured over the cod or other seafood.
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pipián, green pumpkin seed sauce, pipian, pipian paste, pipián paste
pipián
This Hispanic paste is made from ground pumpkin seeds mixed with oil, chiles, sesame seeds, and other ingredients. It's used to make rich, creamy sauces.
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piri piri sauce, piri-piri sauce
piri piri sauce
This is a fiery Portuguese sauce. To make your own: See the Piri Piri Sauce recipe posted on RecipeSource.com.
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plastic wrap
plastic wrap
Plastic wrap is terrific for covering foods to be stored in the refrigerator or cooked in the microwave. It clings especially well to glass, ceramic, and china dishes. You can also use it to wrap foods for short-term freezer storage, though you should use aluminum foil if you're storing something in the freezer for a long time since foil is better at preventing moisture loss.
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Ponentine olives
These are mild Italian brine-cured black olives.
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potsticker wrappers, potsticker skins
potsticker wrappers
These small, thick wrappers are stuffed with meat fillings, and then pan-fried and steamed. While assembling the potstickers, keep the stack of wrappers moist by covering them with a damp towel. You can seal the potstickers with a "glue" made with cornstarch and water. Look for stacks of them wrapped in plastic in the refrigerator cases of Asian markets. They freeze well.
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preserved lemon, heriseh, salt-cured lemon
preserved lemon
These are lemons that have been preserved in a salty brine for one or two months. They're a staple of Moroccan cuisine and somewhat hard to find in the U.S.
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