Accompaniments

Accompaniments
Includes condiments, pickles, and olives
tomato puree
tomato puree
Tomato sauce (in Australia) = catsup (in the US)
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tomato sauce
tomato sauce
tomato sauce (in Australia) = catsup (in the US)
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tonkatsu sauce
tonkatsu sauce
This Japanese condiment is used to make yakisoba. Bull Dog is a popular brand.
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tuong
tuong
This is a salty bean paste used in Vietnamese cuisine.
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wasabi powder
wasabi powder
Look for this in the Asian foods section of your supermarket. It comes either in powdered form or as a paste.
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wax paper
wax paper
Invented by Thomas Edison, this is paper that's coated with paraffin wax to make it resistant to moisture. To use wax paper as a cake pan liner, place the pan on the paper, trace its outline, then cut it out and place it in the pan.
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wonton wrappers
wonton wrappers
Wontons are the Chinese answer to ravioli--small packets of meat encased in a thin noodle wrapper. The wrappers are made of flour, eggs, and water, and, once filled with meat, can be easily folded and pinched into shape. While assembling the wontons, keep the stack of wrappers moist by covering them with a damp towel. You can seal the dumplings with a "glue" made with cornstarch and water. The wrappers come in different thicknesses. The thin ones work best in soups, while the thicker ones are best for frying. Look for stacks of them wrapped in plastic in the refrigerator cases of Asian markets. Store them in the refrigerator or freezer, but let them come to room temperature before using.
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Worcestershire sauce
Worcestershire sauce
Health foods sell a vegetarian version of this. To make your own: See the recipe for Worcestershire Sauce posted on RecipeSource.com.
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X.O. sauce
Asians pour this sauce over noodles and seafood. It's made from dried anchovies, shrimp, and chiles.
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