Dairy

Dairy

This category includes milk and cream, cheese, eggs, and cultured milk products, like yogurt, buttermilk, and sour cream.

Graviera
Graviera
It is usually made with cow’s milk or a combination of cow and sheep’s milk.
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Gruyere
Gruyere
Gruyères are excellent melting cheeses, and they're commonly used to make fondues, soufflés, gratins, and hot sandwiches. Varieties include Swiss Gruyère, Beaufort, and Comte.
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half-and-half
half-and-half
(10.5 - 18% fat)
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Haloumi
Haloumi
This salty, crumbly cheese from Cyprus stands up well to heat and can even be fried or grilled. Look for it in Middle Eastern markets. This is made with combination of sheep and goat’s milk.
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hand
hand
This German washed rind cheese is pungent and stinky. It's good with beer, but it would over-power most wines.
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Harz
Harz
Use within a few days after purchasing. For best flavor, serve at room temperature.
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Havarti
Havarti
This mild Danish cheese is perfect for slicing into sandwiches. It's often flavored with spices and chilies.
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heavy cream
heavy cream
at least 36% fat. Unlike heavy cream, lower-fat substitutes like half-and-half and evaporated milk tend to "break" or curdle when added to sauces. To prevent this from happening, heat the sauce over low or medium heat, or reduce the cream substitute before adding it to the sauce. Don't let the sauce boil. Cream sauces made with lower-fat cream substitutes also tend to have less body; to correct for that, consider adding 1 tablespoon flour or 2 teaspoons cornstarch to the sauce for every cup of evaporated milk substituted. Stir the thickener into a paste first to prevent lumps. Ultra-pasteurized whipping cream is harder to whip and has some unpleasant flavor notes.
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Humboldt fog cheese
Humboldt fog cheese
This excellent soft-ripened goat cheese has a layer of vegetable ash running down the middle. It's an excellent table cheese. The rind is edible, and fairly good.
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Idiazabal cheese
Idiazabal cheese
This salty, sharp and crumbly Basque cheese is made with raw sheep's milk. It's usually smoked and aged before it hits the stores. It's a good cheese to grate in salads, melt on meats, or eat with crackers. Try serving it with sherry.
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jack cheese
jack cheese
This California semi-soft cheese resembles Muenster. It has a mild, nondescript flavor, but it's good cheese to slice into sandwiches or melt into casseroles. It also goes by California jack, Monterey jack, Sonoma jack, and Mexican jack, depending on where it was produced. Efforts to boost the flavor have produced Pepper Jack = Jalapeno Jack. Don't confuse this with aged jack, which is a grating cheese.
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Jarlsberg
Jarlsberg
This is a Norwegian knock-off of Emmentaler. It's mild, creamy yellow, and has large holes.
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jocoque
jocoque
This is a Mexican product that's halfway between buttermilk and sour cream.
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Kashkaval
Kashkaval
This is a Bulgarian version of Italy's Caciocavallo cheese. It becomes much firmer as it ages and turns into a good grating cheese. It is usually made with cow’s milk or a combination of cow and sheep’s milk.
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Kashkaval (aged)
Kashkaval (aged)
Don't confuse this with ordinary Kashkaval, which is a semi-firm cheese.
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kasseri
kasseri
This salty and tangy Greek cheese is made from sheep's milk. It's great on pizza.
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Kefalotyri
Kefalotyri
This tangy hard Greek cheese is often grated over dishes. This can be made from sheep’s milk, goat’s milk or both.
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kefir
kefir
Kefir is like a thin, drinkable yogurt. It was originally made in Turkey out of camel's milk. It comes plain or flavored.
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kochkäse
kochkäse
This German cheese is easy to spread. It's great on crackers and rye bread.
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kumiss
kumiss
Like kefir, kumiss is a beverage made from milk cultured with bacteria. Asian nomads originally made it with the milk of camels or mares, but commercial producers now use cow's milk.
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Lagerkaese
This is a strong even stinky cheese.
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Laguiole
Laguiole
This is a mild French semi-soft cheese.
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Lancashire
Lancashire
This is a rich, tangy, and crumbly cow's milk cheese produced in Britain. It's a good melting cheese.
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Lappi
Lappi
This is a mild semi-soft cheese from the Lapland region of Finland. It's a good melter and works well in fondues
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Leerdammer
Leerdammer
This Dutch cheese is similar to Emmental or Jarlberg, only milder.
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Leicester
Leicester
This is an English cheese that's very similar to cheddar.
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Leyden
Leyden
This Dutch cheese is flavored with cumin and caraway seeds.
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Liederkranz
Use within a few days after purchasing. For best flavor, serve at room temperature. This cheese was invented by German-American Emil Frey, who wanted to make a domestic version of Limburger cheese. Borden acquired the brand after Frey died, and later sold the brand to a New Zealand outfit. It's hard, and perhaps impossible, to find in the United States.
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light cream
light cream
18 - 30% fat Unlike heavy cream, lower-fat substitutes like light cream, half-and-half, and evaporated milk tend to "break" or curdle when added to sauces. To prevent this from happening, heat the sauce over low or medium heat, or reduce the cream substitute before adding it to the sauce. Don't let the sauce boil. Cream sauces made with lower-fat cream substitutes also tend to have less body; to correct for that, consider adding 1 tablespoon flour or 2 teaspoons cornstarch to the sauce for every cup of evaporated milk substituted. Stir the thickener into a paste first to prevent lumps.
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light whipping cream
light whipping cream
30 - 36% fat Unlike heavy cream or whipping cream, lower-fat substitutes like half-and-half and evaporated milk tend to "break" or curdle when added to sauces. To prevent this from happening, heat the sauce over low or medium heat, or reduce the cream substitute before adding it to the sauce. Don't let the sauce boil. Cream sauces made with lower-fat cream substitutes also tend to have less body; to correct for that, consider adding 1 tablespoon flour or 2 teaspoons cornstarch to the sauce for every cup of evaporated milk substituted. Stir the thickener into a paste first to prevent lumps.
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Limburger
Limburger
This is a very stinky and salty German washed rind cheese. It's too strong to serve with most wines, so it's often served with beer. Use within a few days after purchasing. For best flavor, serve at room temperature.
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Livarot
Livarot
This excellent French cheese is in the washed-rind or "stinky" family. Though pungent, it's not as overpowering as Limburger. The rind is edible, but it's not for faint-hearted.
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mahon
mahon
This well-regarded Spanish cheese is a terrific snacking cheese, but it's also incorporated into casseroles. Try it with sherry.
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Mainz
Use within a few days after purchasing. For best flavor, serve at room temperature.
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Manchego (aged)
Manchego (aged)
Aged Manchego cheese is yellow and a terrific grating cheese. Don't confuse it with unaged Manchego cheese, which is almost white, semi-firm, and typically used as a melting cheese
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Manchego cheese
Manchego cheese
Don't confuse this with aged Manchego cheese, which is firm and yellow, and typically used for grating. Younger Manchego cheese is sweet and nutty. It melts nicely and is often used in quesadillas.
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Manouri cheese
Manouri cheese
This Greek sheep's and goat's milk cheese is similar to feta, only creamier and less salty. This is made with sheep or goat’s milk.
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Maroilles
Maroilles
This is a stinky washed-rind cheese from France that smells worse than it tastes. You probably don't want to eat the pungent rind. Use within a few days after purchasing. For best flavor, serve at room temperature.
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mascarpone
mascarpone
A key ingredient in tiramisu and zabaglione, mascarpone is velvety soft, slightly acidic, and expensive. Although Italian in origin, the name is said to come from the Spanish mas que bueno, "better than good." It's usually sold in tubs. Use it soon after you purchase it since it's highly perishable.
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Maytag Blue
Maytag Blue
This American blue cheese is pungent and crumbly. Use it within a few days after purchasing. For best flavor, serve at room temperature.
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meringue powder
meringue powder
Look for this in stores that sell cake decorating supplies. Substitutes: powdered egg whites. For information on how to make meringues safely using raw egg whites, visit the Other Safety Factors section of the American Egg Board web site.
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milk 0.5%, nonfat
milk 0.5%, nonfat
Nonfat milk (0.5% fat). You can buy it fresh, or as powdered milk, canned evaporated milk, or UHT milk packed in aseptic containers. Fresh is best for drinking and delicate desserts, the other kinds pick up an unpleasant caramelized flavor when they're heated for packaging. Acidophilus milk tastes much the same as ordinary milk, but it includes the beneficial acidophilus bacteria that are destroyed during pasteurization.
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milk 2%, Low-fat
milk 2%, Low-fat
Low-fat milk (2% fat). You can buy it fresh, or as powdered milk, canned evaporated milk, or UHT milk packed in aseptic containers. Fresh is best for drinking and delicate desserts, the other kinds pick up an unpleasant caramelized flavor when they're heated for packaging. Acidophilus milk tastes much the same as ordinary milk, but it includes the beneficial acidophilus bacteria that are destroyed during pasteurization.
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milk 3.5%
milk 3.5%
Varieties: skim milk = nonfat milk (0.5% fat), low-fat milk (2% fat), and whole milk (3.5% fat). You can buy it fresh, or as powdered milk, canned evaporated milk, or UHT milk packed in aseptic containers. Fresh is best for drinking and delicate desserts, the other kinds pick up an unpleasant caramelized flavor when they're heated for packaging. Acidophilus milk tastes much the same as ordinary milk, but it includes the beneficial acidophilus bacteria that are destroyed during pasteurization.
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